TitreDu nationalisme au surréalisme : une petite histoire de coffrets
Type de publicationArticle de revue
Année de publication2012
AuteursSéverine Lepape
JournalBulletin du bibliophile
Numéro1
Pagination11–23
Résumé

Caskets with woodcuts have recently been rediscovered thanks to the auction sale of the André and Marie-Thérèse Jammes collection in 2007. But their history has yet to be written. Records are silent about their use, but from the early 19th century on public institutions began showing some interest and getting them sporadically into their collections. In the early 20th century, the Cabinet des Estampes of the Paris Bibliothèque Nationale, with Henri Bouchot, and the Berlin Kupferstichkabinett, with Max Lehrs, carried out a firm acquisition policy and built up the core of their casket collection (at the present time 16 items in Paris, 8 in Berlin). Both curators bought those objects because of the woodcut pasted inside, for they are splendid examples of the early use of woodcuts. Still, the curators' passion for those caskets has to be seen in a wider context: tracing the origins of woodcuts from a nationalist angle, in order to show that either Germany or France had been the first country to produce and therefore invent woodcuts. Jean Masson, who collected manuscripts, drawings, prints and incunabula, also acquired in the years 1910?1920 five caskets, which would figure in his 1935 donation to the Ecole Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris. A friend of Henri Bouchot's, Jean Masson was an active member of the Société de la Gravure sur Bois which staged in the first quarter of the 20th century quite important exhibitions about woodcuts. So, his purchase of caskets with woodcut fitted in with the woodcut rediscovery and promotion. For Edmond Bomsel, a friend of the Surrealists and one of the founders of the Compagnie de l'Art Brut, caskets with woodcuts?he owned a few?were examples of popular images, of which he had built up an impressive collection.

Champ de recherche: 
du nationalisme au surrealisme une petite histoire de coffrets bulletin du bibliophile pcaskets with woodcuts have recently been rediscovered thanks to the auction sale of the andre and marietherese jammes collection in 2007 but their history has yet to be written records are silent about their use but from the early 19th century on public institutions began showing some interest and getting them sporadically into their collections in the early 20th century the cabinet des estampes of the paris bibliotheque nationale with henri bouchot and the berlin kupferstichkabinett with max lehrs carried out a firm acquisition policy and built up the core of their casket collection at the present time 16 items in paris 8 in berlin both curators bought those objects because of the woodcut pasted inside for they are splendid examples of the early use of woodcuts still the curators passion for those caskets has to be seen in a wider context tracing the origins of woodcuts from a nationalist angle in order to show that either germany or france had been the first country to produce and therefore invent woodcuts jean masson who collected manuscripts drawings prints and incunabula also acquired in the years 19101920 five caskets which would figure in his 1935 donation to the ecole nationale des beauxarts in paris a friend of henri bouchots jean masson was an active member of the societe de la gravure sur bois which staged in the first quarter of the 20th century quite important exhibitions about woodcuts so his purchase of caskets with woodcut fitted in with the woodcut rediscovery and promotion for edmond bomsel a friend of the surrealists and one of the founders of the compagnie de lart brut caskets with woodcutshe owned a fewwere examples of popular images of which he had built up an impressive collectionp severine lepape
Retour en haut de page